Pets, Libraries, and Ongoing Debates

A library and archives comic featuring a basset hound, a miniature dachshund, and a blue and gold macaw.

Although inspired by my life, this comic is fiction and any resemblance to situations or persons past or present is entirely coincidental.

-- Dejah Rubel

Professional Development Question: Does Part-Time Management Experience Count?

I know, it’s so rare to see me on here these days, and even rarer still to hear me ask or comment upon our profession directly, but I’m in a bit of a bind. So, if you’re in library management (upper preferably) please let me know what you think about my situation.

Not to count chickens, but I’m interviewing for two positions right now, one of which builds upon my current experience by adding more technical skills and is full-time. The other is a part-time but it’s a directorship of a public library. Granted, I truly have to decide what I really want in terms of my career (and hope the timing works out) but I have a few questions I’d like to ask other library managers.

Would part-time high level management experience allow me to pursue other (preferably full-time) director positions in the near future? (Say 1-3 years after hired.)

Or am I moving “backwards” in my career trajectory by going from full-time to part-time because so many library positions REQUIRE years of full-time employment? (If it matters, I’d be leaving my first full-time faculty position at a community college, which took me 3 years of part-time hustling to achieve. I also worry about this decision because I left a prestigious Special Collections part-time job to gain reference experience working part-time at a for-profit institution. I often wonder if that reflects poorly on me.)

Or does it really boil down the duties of the directorship? If so, please let me know what the vital duties are to continue advancing in the profession. (Must be in charge of hiring, firing, budgets, fundraising etc.)

Finally, and this is really an etiquette question, if you are considering two positions at the same time and you’re waiting to the interviewed for one while the offer arrives for the other, how do you handle that tension? Or do you have to decline the first offer in hopes of getting the second? Or do you accept and then leave immediately if the (presumably more desirable) full-time job pans out? (Don’t worry. I won’t ask you about the logistics behind moving because that’s a consideration in this balancing act too.)

Any advice appreciated. No idea what I’m going to do and now that I’ve spoken publicly about this problem, it’ll probably dissolve on its own. (They’ll both reject me! Lol.) But the part-time management question is still important to me regardless. Thanks in advance!

2013 Book List

I know, I should’ve done this months ago, but it’s painful to reformat and I’ve been ignoring this blog for at least six months. Too much drama in everyday life to keep trying to draw it all.

But admit it, you’re dying to know what I read last year.

As for stats, I was up 61 books from 124 in 2012 to 185 in 2013. Of course, that doesn’t count periodicals or articles or stuff read online unless it was an eBook. But I do count graphic novels even if they’re small. Hit me up on Goodreads for official reviews. (Yes, I know Amazon bought them out, but I still submit reviews.)

2 Sisters by Matt Kindt

5 Very Good Reasons to Punch a Dolphin in the Mouth and Other Useful Guides by Matthew Inman

65 Great Spine Chillers edited by Mary Danby

65 Short Stories by W. Somerset Maugham

100 Vicious Little Vampire Stories by Martin H. Greenberg

1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

The Accidental Genius of Weasel High by Rick Detorie

Alas Babylon by Pat Frank

The Alchemist’s Daughter by Katharine McMahon

American Salvage by Bonnie Jo Campbell

Another Day in Cubicle Paradise by Scott Adams

Any Empire by Nate Powell

Argo by Antonio Mendez

Armageddon in Retrospect by Kurt Vonnegut

An Arsonist’s Guide to Writer’s Homes in New England by Brock Clarke

Art Deco in Detroitby Rebecca Binno Savage

Awkward Family Pet Photos by Mike Bender

Ayn Rand’s Anthem by Charles Santino

The Ayn Rand Cult by Jeff Walker

Back Roads by Tawni O’Dell

Bad Medicine by Christopher Wanjek

The Baltimore Case by Daniel J. Kevles

The Band That Played On by Steve Turner

The Big Bento Box of Unuseless Japanese Inventions by Kenji Kawakami

Bilbo’s Last Song by J.R.R. Tolkien

Birdseye by Mark Kurlansky

The Black Dahlia by James Ellroy

Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin

Blondie by Dean W. Young

Blood on the Table by Colin Evans

Body Surfing by Anita Shreve

Breath, Eyes, Memory by Edwidge Danticat

The Bride of Science by Benjamin Woolley

A Brief History of the Smile by Angus Trumble

The Boy in the Suitcase by Lene Kaaberbol

The Casebook of Forensic Detection by Colin Evans

Casual Fridays by John Lustig

Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

A Change in Altitude by Anita Shreve

A Clash of Kings by George R. R. Martin

Cleveland by Harvey Pekar

The Cloudspotter’s Guide by Gavin Pretor-Pinney

Clumsy by Jeffrey Brown

The Cockroach Papers by Richard Schweid

Cod by Mark Kurlansky

The Corrections by Jonathan Franzen

Crazy Bosses by Stanley Bing

Crime Scene Investigation by Colin Evans

Cry the Beloved Country by Alan Paton

Dark Forces by Kirby McCauley

Darwin Awards I & II by Wendy Northcutt

Daughter of Fortune by Isabel Allende

Death Comes to Pemberly by P.D. James

Destiny of the Republic by Candice Millard

Dilbert 2.0 by Scott Adams

Do As I Say (Not As I Do) by Peter Schweizer

Don’t Let the Republican Drive the Bus! by Erich Origen

Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz

The Eagle Squadrons by Vern Haugland

Eat Fat by Richard Klein

Escape by Carolyn Jessop

Every Girl is the End of the World for Me by Jeffrey Brown

Evidence by Colin Evans

The Extraordinary Voyage of Pytheas the Greek by Barry W. Cunliffe

Fall on Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald

The Family That Couldn’t Sleep by D.T. Max

Farley and the Lost Bone by Lynn Johnston

The Father of Forensics by Colin Evans

First Fruit by Belinda Martineau

Flower Confidential by Amy Stewart

A Fly for the Prosecution by M. Lee Goff

Forgotten Detroit by Paul Vachon

Frontiers Past and Future by Carl Abbott

Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin

Gap Creek by Robert Morgan

The Great Book of Optical Illusions by Al Seckel

Great Feuds in History by Colin Evans

The Heartbreak Diet by Thorina Rose

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers

Hedy’s Folly by Richard Rhodes

Hellhound on His Trail by Hampton Sides

Here on Earth by Alice Hoffman

Hitler by A.N. Wilson

The House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubas III

Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

I Am Hutterite by Mary-Ann Kirkby

I Can’t Remember If We’re Cheap or Smart by Scott Adams

The Infernal Devices 1, 2, 3 by Cassandra Clare

Infidel by Ayaan Hirsi Ali

Island of the Lost Girls by Jennifer McMahon

Korgi 1, 2, 3 by Christian Slade

The Last Time They Metby Anita Shreve

A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines

Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls by David Sedaris

Letters to Father by Dava Sobel

Looking for Earths by Alan Boss

Lords of the HarvestLost Languages by Andrew Robinson

The Man Who Loved Books Too Much by Allison Hoover Bartlett

A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton

Mauve by Simon Garfield

Michigan City Lighthouse by Steven Elve

The Mind at Night by Andrea Rock

A Mind of Its Own by David M. Friedman

A Mind of Its Own by Cordelia Fine

Mr. Playboy by Steven Watts

Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins

Monkey Mind by Daniel B. Smith

Mother of Pearl by Melinda Haynes

Moving Pictures by Kathryn Immonen

Murder 2 by Colin Evans

The Museum of Hoaxes by Alex Boese

Never Shower in a Thunderstorm by Anahad O’Connor

NPR Funniest Driveway Moments by Robert Krulwich

Off the Record by David Morton

Orange Is the New Black by Piper Kerman

Our Own Devices by Edward Tenner

Outwitting the Gestapo by Lucie Aubrac

The Painted Girls by Cathy Marie Buchanan

Paradise by Toni Morrison

Passionate Minds by David Bodanis

Peanuts by Andrew F. Smith

Photo Booth by Lewis Helfand

A Pirate of Exquisite Mind by Diana Preston

The Poisoner’s Handbook by Deborah Blum

Postcards : True Stories that Never Happened by Jason Rodriguez

Pride and Promiscuity by Dennis Ashton

Problem Identified by Scott Adams

Queen of the South by Arturo Perez-Reverte

Question of Evidence by Colin Evans

The Radioactive Boy Scout by Ken Silverstein

Rescue by Anita Shreve

Return from the River Kwai by Joan Blair

Return of the Crazy Bird by Clara Pinto-Correia

Salt by Mark Kurlansky

Santa’s Village by Phillip L. Wenz

Sea Glass by Anita Shreve

A Season of Fear by Abraham Polonsky

ASecret Gift by Ted Gup

Sex Day by John Lustig

Shattered Dreams by Irene Spencer

Shoes of a Servant by Diane Benscoter

Short Stories: Five Decades by Irwin Shaw

Sin, Shame, and Secrets by David Yonke

Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury

Soul Made Flesh by Carl Zimmer

The Stinky Cheese Man by Jon Scieszka

Stolen Lives by Malika Oufkir

Stones from the River by Ursula Hegi

A Storm of Swords by George R. R. Martin

Super Lawyers by Colin Evans

Survival by Ben East

Swallow Me Whole by Nate Powell

Tales of Woodsman Pete by Lilli Carre

Teamwork Means You Can’t Pick the Side That’s Right by Scott Adams

The Templar Legacy by Steve Berry

Testimony by Anita Shreve

This Is Not a Weasel by Philip B. Mortenson

This Is Your Brain on Music by Daniel J. Levitin

The Times of Their Lives by James Deetz

Triumph by Carolyn Jessop

Underwire by Jennifer Hayden

Valiant by Holly Black

Vinegar Hill by A. Manette Ansay

A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan

A Wedding in December by Anita Shreve

We Were the Mulvaneys by Joyce Carol Oates

What a Young Husband Ought to Know by Sylvanus Stall

What a Young Man Ought to Know by Sylvanus Stall

When Parents Text by Sophia Fraioli

While I Was Gone by Sue Miller

The Winter Garden by Kristin Hannah

Wizzywig by Ed Piskor

Women in Love by D.H. Lawrence

Women on WarDaniella Gioseffi

Well, I thought I uploaded the pictures from my previous lobby display, but apparently not. I also need to update with my 2013 book list, but that could take awhile, so I won’t get into that now.

Meanwhile, enjoy the three cases I created this morning for Women’s History Month and the two cases I created for Science Is Fun! I originally planned on making both of these small displays within the library, like my women’s history case last year, but everyone had already claimed them. So, although they don’t appear to ‘go together’ I’m hoping that I’ve unearthed a few science gems that’ll get checked out.

My Halloween zombie. Took me 45 mins to draw and then someone from e-Learning came up and told me they were using our classroom today, hence the arrow and title by his feet. (Definitely not erasing him after starting over 10+ times. Body positioning is hard!)

My Halloween zombie. Took me 45 mins to draw and then someone from e-Learning came up and told me they were using our classroom today, hence the arrow and title by his feet. (Definitely not erasing him after starting over 10+ times. Body positioning is hard!)

It’s been a busy few weeks of nothing but classes and events, so no drawing on the whiteboard. Will try to cram in as many Halloween drawings as possible over the next few days as it looks like we’re scheduling more for the next few weeks too.

It’s been a busy few weeks of nothing but classes and events, so no drawing on the whiteboard. Will try to cram in as many Halloween drawings as possible over the next few days as it looks like we’re scheduling more for the next few weeks too.

It’s a barn! And, yes, I know the roof on the right is jacked. I tried re-doing it several times and then gave up. But the windmill looks like what it is, right?
Definitely drawing from a references tomorrow. Freehanding this morning has gotten me in trouble. :/

It’s a barn! And, yes, I know the roof on the right is jacked. I tried re-doing it several times and then gave up. But the windmill looks like what it is, right?

Definitely drawing from a references tomorrow. Freehanding this morning has gotten me in trouble. :/

Having to list fun stuff like all the classes we’ve been teaching prevented me from drawing the past two days. I thought long and hard about this eagle because I wanted to honor this tragic day but without earning myself another lecture on diversity. (If challenged I plan to counter with my drawings from Ramadan. I have no issues with Muslims or the Islamic faith but neither do I believe we should neglect to honor the victims and heroes of this horrible tragedy.) And, yes, I’m aware that the lettering isn’t perfectly balanced or spaced but after re-doing the right side once I decided to let it ride or I’d be spending all morning re-working it.

Having to list fun stuff like all the classes we’ve been teaching prevented me from drawing the past two days. I thought long and hard about this eagle because I wanted to honor this tragic day but without earning myself another lecture on diversity. (If challenged I plan to counter with my drawings from Ramadan. I have no issues with Muslims or the Islamic faith but neither do I believe we should neglect to honor the victims and heroes of this horrible tragedy.) And, yes, I’m aware that the lettering isn’t perfectly balanced or spaced but after re-doing the right side once I decided to let it ride or I’d be spending all morning re-working it.

Happy Scarecrow Thursday!
I tried to draw some corn behind him but if you haven’t drawn cornstalks lately, they’re hellishly difficult, especially on marker board. So, there’s a fat crow and a skinny angry crow (that I love!) to give you the illusion of corn somewhere out of sight.
I also didn’t draw him in the usual scarecrow pose because that always reminds me of the hoards of crucified Christs I drew in high school. (I was a weird kid going through a highly spiritual phase.)

Happy Scarecrow Thursday!

I tried to draw some corn behind him but if you haven’t drawn cornstalks lately, they’re hellishly difficult, especially on marker board. So, there’s a fat crow and a skinny angry crow (that I love!) to give you the illusion of corn somewhere out of sight.

I also didn’t draw him in the usual scarecrow pose because that always reminds me of the hoards of crucified Christs I drew in high school. (I was a weird kid going through a highly spiritual phase.)

The lettering took me way too long. I obviously need to get back to doing the whiteboard though next week will be rounds of classes, so expect to see TONS of variations on arrows!
I should’ve colored it in too but I was hoping to frame it with an open book. That didn’t go well either, so I kinda gave up after re-doing the lettering. I will write a proper post on what does and doesn’t work in this medium so maybe you’ll get a sense of why I’m resisting color these days. (Not worth the effort to lay it in most of the time.)

The lettering took me way too long. I obviously need to get back to doing the whiteboard though next week will be rounds of classes, so expect to see TONS of variations on arrows!

I should’ve colored it in too but I was hoping to frame it with an open book. That didn’t go well either, so I kinda gave up after re-doing the lettering. I will write a proper post on what does and doesn’t work in this medium so maybe you’ll get a sense of why I’m resisting color these days. (Not worth the effort to lay it in most of the time.)

Tried to do a textured farm scene with some depth. Ever since I first started seeing the rolls of hay last week, I’ve wanted to do this piece. Didn’t come out perfectly (depth could use some work) but I still like it.

Tried to do a textured farm scene with some depth. Ever since I first started seeing the rolls of hay last week, I’ve wanted to do this piece. Didn’t come out perfectly (depth could use some work) but I still like it.